8 new charges laid against teacher in sexual abuse investigation

Winnipeg high school football coach and teacher Kelsey McKay faces eight more charges related to sexual abuse of minors during his time at Churchill High School and Vincent Massey Collegiate.

Kelsey McKay, 51, was arrested on April 12 and charged with 14 offences related to the sexual exploitation of minors while he worked as a teacher and coached football at the high schools. The complainants are five former students at the high schools.

Since his arrest, three more complainants have come forward, saying they were abused while McKay was working at Churchill High School.

The new charges are three counts of sexual assault, three counts of sexual exploitation and two counts of luring. 

None of the allegations have been proven in court.

All eight victims are now adults, but were minors when they say the offences occurred.

Most of the assaults involving the first five complainants happened at McKay’s home, Const. Dani McKinnon said at a news conference on April 13, after McKay’s initial arrest.

McKinnon also said on April 13 that McKay forged relationships with students that were beyond what is appropriate for teachers and coaches, and that she would not be surprised if more complainants came forward after learning about his arrest.

As of April 13, McKay was still employed as a teacher at Vincent Massey Collegiate, in the Pembina Trails School Division.

Pembina Trails School Division superintendent Ted Fransen told parents via email on April 13 that McKay had been put on unpaid administrative leave and would not be allowed on school property.

McKay now faces a total of 22 charges:

  • Eight counts of sexual assault.
  • Seven counts of sexual exploitation.
  • One count of sexual interference.
  • Six counts of luring.

The Winnipeg police sex crimes unit continues to investigate and anyone wishing to speak to investigators can contact them at 204-986-6245.

Support is available for anyone who has been sexually assaulted. You can access crisis lines and local support services through this Government of Canada website or the Ending Violence Association of Canada database. ​​If you’re in immediate danger or fear for your safety or that of others around you, please call 911. 

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